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Ebb And Flow looks at notions of individual and collective representations. Be it, the self vs the other or the singular vs the multiple, it seeks to play one off the other by questioning
the boundaries that may or may not set them apart. Through the use of video and sound, Ebb And Flow aims to dissolve those boundaries that suggest notions of self autonomy,
while at the same time emphasising the appeal of losing oneself to the collective. A collective that is free to manifest itself in many ways, be it for just or unjust purposes.

Content:

This installation comprises of dual video synchronisation. One video (comprising of a waterline) is back projected onto a suspended sheet of frosted glass.
The other is shown on a flat-screen monitor that is secured under an elevated floor and viewed through a fitted water drain cover, directly in front of the suspended glass.

Entering the space, the viewer faces a video of a falling and rising waterline that is projected onto frosted glass. As the water slowly drains from the screen, the viewer will notice
on the floor by their feet, a video of water slowly depositing into a mouth. As the water drains entirely from the above video, the mouth beneath the drain eventually disappears.
This results in the waterline rising once again and the cycle continues..

Sound:

The sound accompanying the visuals comprises of a single voice reciting, repetitively, a chapter from a John Donne poem entitled ‘Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions’ (1623-1624) :

"No man is an island, entire of itself;
every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main.
If a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe is the less,
as well as if a promontory were,
as well as if a manor of thy friend's or of thine own were
any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind,
and therefore never send to know for whom the bells tolls; it tolls for thee."

As the waterline falls and deposits into the mouth, the sound of ‘marching’ emerges and slowly becomes more prevalent. Gradually increasing in volume, this ‘marching sound’ eventually
consumes the single voice heard at the beginning. The opposite occurs as the waterline rises and so on. In addition, the sound of a bell continuously rings out for the entire duration.

Installation 2008